Africa - Asia - Europe - South America - North America - Central America

You are here: Home > Mongolia

Education in Mongolia

Mongolia - education

After extensive social changes in the early 1990's, the education system sought to move away from the Soviet model and adopt a more Western orientation.

Education in Mongolia

  • TopSchoolsintheUSA: Do you plan to take the TOEFL exam in Mongolia? Visit the website to find TOEFL preparation and scoring information as well as iBT test dates and locations around this country.

The school system includes a preschool, which is applied for by up to approximately 1/3. The ten-year compulsory school for 8-17-year-olds is public and free. The six-year primary school is followed by a two- or three-year general or vocational education and then a more specialized education of similar duration. Almost 12% drop out before the end of the compulsory course (1992).

There are five universities (1997) and several higher education institutions, some of which are private, where admission is conditional on a passed entrance examination.

POPULATION

OFFICIAL NAME: Mongol Uls

CAPITAL CITY: Ulan Bator

POPULATION: 2,830,000 (Source: COUNTRYaah)

AREA: 1,600,000 km²

OFFICIAL LANGUAGE (S): khalkha and other Mongolian languages ​​as well as Turkish languages

RELIGION: Buddhists 96%, others (especially Christians and Muslims) 4%

COIN: tugrik

CURRENCY CODE: MNT

ENGLISH NAME: Mongolia

POPULATION COMPOSITION: Mongols 89% (by far most Khalkamongols), Kazakhs 6%, Tuvins 2%, others 3%

GDP PER residents: $ 483 (2007)

LIFE EXPECTANCY: men 62 years, women 68 years (2007)

INDEX OF LIVING CONDITIONS, HDI: 0.691

INDEX OF LIVING CONDITIONS, POSITION: 116

INTERNET DOMAIN NAME: .mn

Mongolia, a republic in northern Central Asia, the world's second largest inland state (after Kazakhstan). The large country is dry, predominantly flat, has an extreme mainland climate with icy winters and is extremely sparsely populated. Mongolia formally became independent in 1921, but in Soviet times the country functioned in many ways as a de facto Soviet republic. Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the country has undergone a process of transition.

Mongolia - Constitution

The Constitution of the Republic of 1992 is characterized by a systematic distinction between the legislature, the executive and the judiciary. Legislative power lies with a unicameral parliament with 76 members, which in 1992 was elected by majority vote in multi-member constituencies and from 1996 is elected by majority election in single-member constituencies.

The president, who is elected by direct election for four years, has mainly ceremonial functions, but can also propose laws, just as he plays a role in government formation. The executive is with the government, which is heavily dependent on the parliament.

The Constitution states that Mongolia's economic system must be based on both private and public property rights, taking into account both international economic developments and Mongolia's special circumstances.

Mongolia - art

The Mongols got the religious art with Buddhism from Tibet. It resembles all other Lamaist art. In particular, Zanabazar (1625-1723), Mongolia's first "living buddha" (Bogdo Jabdzundamba), was known for making beautiful religious figures in gold, many of which are still preserved in Mongolian museums. Zanabazar decorated his art with symbols from the everyday life of the nomads, thereby giving the religious art a special Mongolian touch.

In the late 1800's, a particularly popular painting style emerged, somewhat reminiscent of comics. The pictures show scenes from the nomads' everyday life with a throng of felt tents, livestock and people.

The painter B. Sharav (1869-1939) created one of the masterpieces of this genre, A Day in Mongolia, on two canvases; one shows a rich family's summer camp with milking and caring for livestock, the other shows relocation of camps, weddings and parties (Ulan Bator Art Museum).

The socialist realism of the communist era (1924-90) could not destroy the Mongolian style, which in a renewed form has flourished again.

The National Museum has a unique collection of drawings in this style from the Khalkha Mongol Lodai, who in 1938 worked for Henning Haslund-Christensen.

Mongolia - literature

Two literary genres dominate the older Mongolian literature: the epic narrative and the religious literature. The narrative literature, which often has a long oral tradition behind it, is a mixture of legend and history.

The oldest literary monument in Mongolian is the Chronicle The Secret History of the Mongols, written down around 1240. Other well-known chronicle works are Altan tobci (1655) and Erdeni-yin tobci (1662). The religious literature that has been created between the 16th and 18th centuries is mainly Buddhist works translated from Tibetan and Sanskrit.

Chinese short story and novel art, known in translations from the 1700's and 1800's, and Western literary theories have been important sources of inspiration for recent Mongolian writers, who in the past often had to compromise with the socialist line of the Soviet Communist Party.

 
 
Afghanistan Albania
Angola Argentina
Armenia Australia
Austria Azerbaijan
Bahrain Bangladesh
Belgium Belarus
Benin Bhutan
Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina
Botswana Brazil
Bulgaria Burkina Faso
Burma Burundi
Cambodia Cameroon
Canada Cape Verde
Central African Republic Chad
Chile China
Colombia Costa Rica
Croatia Cuba
Cyprus Czech Republic
Democratic Republic of Congo Denmark
Dominican Republic Ecuador
Egypt Estonia
Ethiopia Faroe Islands
Finland France
Gabon Georgia
Germany Ghana
Greece Greenland
Guatemala Guinea
Guinea-Bissau Guyana
Haiti Honduras
Hong Kong Hungary
Iceland India
Indonesia Iran
Iraq Ireland
Israel Italy
Jamaica Japan
Jordan Kazakhstan
Kenya Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan Laos
Latvia Lebanon
Liberia Libya
Lithuania Luxembourg
Madagascar Malawi
Malaysia Mali
Malta Mauritania
Mexico Moldova
Mongolia Morocco
Mozambique Namibia
Nepal Netherlands
New Zealand Nicaragua
Niger Nigeria
North Korea Northern Macedonia
Norway Oman
Pakistan Panama
Papua New Guinea Paraguay
Peru Philippines
Poland Portugal
Qatar Republic of Congo
Romania Russia
Rwanda Saudi Arabia
Senegal Serbia
Sierra Leone Singapore
Slovakia Slovenia
Solomon Islands Somalia
South Africa South Korea
South Sudan Spain
Sri Lanka Sudan
Suriname Swaziland
Sweden Switzerland
Syria Taiwan
Tajikistan Tanzania
Thailand Togo
Tunisia Turkey
Turkmenistan Uganda
Ukraine United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom USA
Uruguay Uzbekistan
Vatican City Venezuela
Vietnam Yemen
Zambia Zimbabwe

AL AK AZ AR CA
CO CT DE FL GA
HI ID IL IN IA
KS KY LA ME MD
MA MI MN MS MO
MT NE NV NH NJ
NM NY NC ND OH
OK OR PA RI SC
SD TN TX UT VT
VA WA WV WI WY

Copyright 2020 Search for Public Schools | Home