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Education in Jamaica

Jamaica - education

The public school system includes a six-year elementary school for 6-12-year-olds; it is followed by approximately 75%. The superstructure education, which is offered by six different school forms, is divided into a three-year and a two-year level.

Education in Jamaica

Higher education takes place either at Jamaica's own university or at a joint university of the West Indies, both located in Kingston. The school system still has an elitist character, especially in the superstructure education.

POPULATION

OFFICIAL NAME: Jamaica

CAPITAL CITY: Kingston

POPULATION: 2,889,000 (Source: COUNTRYaah)

AREA: 11,425 km²

OFFICIAL LANGUAGE (S): English, Creole-English

RELIGION: Protestants 61%, Catholics 4%, Hindus, Jews, Muslims, Baha'is and Rastafarians 35%

COIN: Jamaican dollar

CURRENCY CODE: JMD

ENGLISH NAME: Jamaica

INDEPENDENCE: 1962

POPULATION COMPOSITION: Afro-Caribbean 91%, mixed (mulattoes) 7%, Indians 1%, others 1%

GDP PER residents: $ 5402 (2011)

LIFE EXPECTANCY: men 69 years, women 73 years (2007)

INDEX OF LIVING CONDITIONS, HDI: 0.730

INDEX OF LIVING CONDITIONS, POSITION: 80

INTERNET DOMAIN NAME: .jm

Jamaica is an island and state with constitutional monarchy south of Cuba in the Caribbean Sea. Jamaica's name is especially associated with the production of sugar and rum, but also with reggae music, which originated here approximately 1960. As in most other Caribbean countries, tourism is of great and increasing importance.

  • AbbreviationFinder.org: Find two-letter abbreviation for each independent country and territory, such as JA which stands for Jamaica.

Jamaica - Constitution

Jamaica is a parliamentary democracy with a constitution from 1962, when the country became independent. The Head of State is the British monarch, represented by a Governor-General, appointed on the proposal of the Prime Minister of Jamaica. Legislative power lies with a bicameral parliament. The Senate has 21 members, 13 of whom are appointed by the Governor-General on a proposal from the Prime Minister, and eight are appointed by the leader of the opposition. The parliamentary center of gravity lies in the House of Representatives with 60 members elected for five years by ordinary, direct elections in single-member constituencies. The executive power lies with the Prime Minister. He is appointed by the Governor-General from among the members of the House of Representatives after an assessment of who enjoys the greatest support there. Check youremailverifier for Jamaica social condition facts.

Jamaica - music

Jamaican music contains a number of features from European, African, Caribbean and North American music, such as the Caribbean calypso. While calypso music in the 1950's was perceived as West Indian folk music, reggae music was especially associated with Jamaica, where throughout the 1960's an extensive local music scene developed precisely around reggae.

Reggae is inspired by rhythm and blues and gospel from the USA, by the Afro-Caribbean rhythms calypso, rumba and merengue as well as by the country's own popular music from the 1940's, mento. In Jamaica, local music releases with the rhythmically somewhat faster ska and rock steady in the 1960's managed to outcompete American records and create an extensive music production and a rich music life. In itinerant discos, so-called sound systems, disc jockey acted as a newscaster who incited the dancers with scat singing and toasting, an early form of rap. The term reggae was first used in 1968. The music is characterized by the fact that all instruments emphasize the rhythm complementary. The texts were originally socially critical, male-dominated, frequently praised marijuana and linked to the afronationalist religious rastafarian movement. Jamaican Bob Marley made reggae internationally known with the album Catch A Fire (1973). See also reggae.

 

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